programme

Politics in South Asia

Home/ Politics in South Asia
Course TypeCourse CodeNo. Of Credits
Foundation ElectiveSUSPO7334

Semester and Year Offered: Winter

Course Coordinator and Team: Dr. Michael Lunminthang

Email of course coordinator: mikehaokip@aud.ac.in

Pre-requisites: None

Aim: This course aims to re-discover this region that has a similar past, a long and strenuous struggle for freedom and state formation, a turbulent yet progressive present and a hopeful future. It emphasizes an understanding of the wider horizon of global politics

Course Outcomes:

  1. This course equip students to gain knowledge and understanding of the interplay of politics, economy, contentious issues and challenges experienced in this region.
  2. It aid towards broadening their perception of politics beyond the Indian subcontinent.
  3. Moreover, it skill them to develop a comparative approach towards study of politics.

Brief description of modules/ Main modules:

  1. Understanding South Asia as a Region: In this introductory set of lectures, students will be familiarized with the South Asian region, the constituent countries, its geo-politics, historical background in light of a common colonial legacy and struggle for freedom.
  2. Politics and Governance in South Asia: It begins with a brief survey of different types of political systems. This includes a critical assessment of ‘ideal-types’ of regimes like democracy (both representative and participatory), authoritarianism, monarchy, military rule, decentralized governance, etc in relation to experiences in different countries.
  3. South Asian Political Economy: The interlinked issues like deprivation, poverty, food insecurity and gender discrimination within the region which needs to be understood along with the economic development in the region are highlighted. Recent developments like reforms linked to structural adjustment programmes, foreign aid, debt relief, country level rankings like Human Development Index are given discussed in the module.
  4. Efforts of Regional Integration in South Asia The module looks at South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC), its role and relevance in contemporary times. The effectiveness of trade agreements like SAFTA and SAPTA are evaluated, in light of issues like illicit trading causing loss of revenue. Success stories of economic empowerment of women through initiatives like micro-credit institutions are taken up.
  5. Regional Issues and Challenges in South Asia The module emphasises on insecurity and intolerance that gives way to anti-social activities like terrorism, religious fundamentalism amounting to fanaticism (India), preaching hatred and violence towards minority and powerless communities and ethnic conflicts/ ethnic cleansing (Sri Lanka) are given importance for viable future solutions.

Assessment Details with weights:

  • Mid Semester Exam - 40%
  • Take home assignment - 20%
  • End Semester Exam - 40%

Reading List:

  • Hewitt, V. (1992) ‘Introduction’, in The International Politics of South Asia. Manchester: Manchester University Press, pp.1-10.
  • Hewitt, V. (2010) ‘International Politics of South Asia’ in Brass, P. (ed.) Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics. London: Routledge, pp.399-418.
  • Muni, S.D. (200 ‘South Asia as a Region’, South Asian Journal, 1(1), August-September, pp. 1-6
  • Baxter, C. (ed.) (1986) The Government and Politics of South Asia. London: Oxford University Press, pp.376-394.
  • Baxter, C. (2010) ‘Introduction’, Brass, P. (ed.) Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics. London: Routledge, pp.1-24
  • De Silva, K.M. (2001)‘The Working of Democracy in South Asia’, in Panandikar, V.A (ed.) Problems of Governance in South Asia. New Delhi: Centre for Policy Research & Konark Publishing House, pp. 46-88.
  • Mendis, D. (2008) ‘South Asian Democracies in Transition’, in Mendis, D. (ed.) Electoral Processes and Governance in South Asia. New Delhi: Sage, pp.15-52.
  • Subramanyam, K. (2001) ‘Military and Governance in South Asia’, in V.A (ed.) Problems of Governance in South Asia. New Delhi: Centre for Policy Research & Konark Publishing House, pp.201-208.
  • Kukreja, V. 2011. ‘Federalism in Pakistan’, in Saxena R. (ed.) Varieties of Federal Governance. New Delhi: Foundation Books, pp. 104-130.
  • Jha, N.K. (2008) ‘Domestic Turbulence in Nepal: Origin, Dimensions and India’s Policy Options’, in Kukreja, V. and Singh, M.P. (eds.) Democracy, Development and Discontent in South Asia. New Delhi: Sage, pp. 264-281.
  • Burki, S.J. (2010) ‘Pakistan’s Politics and its Economy’, in Brass, P. (ed.) Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics. London: Routledge, pp. 83-97.
  • Kaul, N. (2008) ‘Bearing Better Witness in Bhutan’, Economic and Political Weekly, 13 September, pp. 67-69.
  • Phadnis, U.(1986) ‘Ethnic Conflicts in South Asian States’, in Muni, S.D. et.al. (eds.) Domestic Conflicts in South Asia : Political, Economic and Ethnic Dimensions. Vol. 2. New Delhi: South Asian Publishers, pp.100-119.
  • Phadnis, U., S.D Muni and Kalim Bahadur (1986) ‘Ethnic Conflicts in South Asian States’, in Muni, S.D. et.al. (eds.) Domestic Conflicts in South Asia : Political, Dimensions. Vol.1. New Delhi: South Asian Publishers, pp.100-119.
  • Kukreja, V. (2003) Contemporary Pakistan. pp. 75-111. New Delhi: Sage
  • Narayan, S. (2010) ‘SAARC and South Asia Economic Integration’, in Muni, S.D. (ed.) Emerging dimensions of SAARC. New Delhi: Foundation Books, pp. 32-50.
  • Muni, S.D. and Jetley, R. (2010) ‘SAARC prospects: the Changing Dimensions’, in Muni, S.D. (ed.) Emerging dimensions of SAARC. New Delhi: Foundation Books, pp. 1-31.
  • Baral, L.R. (2006) ‘Responding to Terrorism: Political and Social Consequences in South Asia’, in Muni, S.D. (ed.) Responding to terrorism in South Asia. New Delhi: Manohar, pp.301-332.
  • Muni, S.D. (2006) ‘Responding to Terrorism: An Overview’, in Muni, S.D. (ed.) Responding to terrorism in South Asia. New Delhi: Manohar, pp.453-469.
  • Hoyt, T.D. (2005) ‘The War on Terrorism: Implications for South Asia’, in Hagerty, D.T. (ed.) South Asia in World Politics. Lanham: Roman and Littlefield Publishers, pp.281-295.
  • Lama, M. (2003) ‘Poverty, Migration and Conflict: Challenges to Human Security in South Asia’, in Chari, P.R. and Gupta, S. (eds.) Human Security in South Asia: Gender, Energy, Migration and Globalisation. New Delhi: Social Science Press, pp. 124-144
  • Acharya, J. and Bose, T.K. (2001) ‘The New Search for a Durable Solution for Refugees: South Asia’, in Samaddar, S. and Reifeld, H. (eds.) Peace as Process: Reconciliation and Conflict Resolution in South Asia. New Delhi: Vedams ,pp-137-157
  • Kohli, Atul, 2001. “Indian Democracy: the Historical Inheritance,” chapter 2 in The Success of India’s Democracy, edited by Atul Kohli, Cambridge University Press, p. 23-46
  • Jayal, Ayesha. 1995. Various Selections, pages 48-65, 77-85, 100-120 from chapters 2 and 3, Democracy and Authoritarianism in South Asia. Cambridge University Press
  • Malik, K,Y.,Kennedy, C.H.,Oberst,R.C.,Kapur,A.,Lawoti,M.,and Rahman,S. (eds.) (2009) Government and Politics in South Asia, Westview press
  • Hagerty, D.T (ed.) (2005) South Asia in World Politics. Rawman and Little Field publishers
  • Jamil, I.,Askwik,S.,and Dhakal,T.N., (eds.) (2013) In Search of Better Governance in South Asia and Beyond, Springer.